Tag Archive | hazens blueberries coquille oregon

“Road Scholar Program” Pays a Special Visit to Hazen’s Riverside Blueberry Farm

The “Road Scholar” program is best described as “an adventure in lifelong learning.”  People of all ages, from K-12 aged school kids to parents and senior citizens  – join the program from all over the world and make “road scholar expeditions” all around America, learning as they go. One month your find the Road Scholars digging on an archeological site, the next month they might be learning to forage for wild mushrooms or picking blueberries on a farm. Jeremy Jones is the director / coordinator for the group in our region through http://socc.edu

“Explore the World With Road Scholar

Educational Travel Since 1975

Road Scholar, the not-for-profit leader in educational travel since 1975, offers 5,500 educational tours in all 50 states and 150 countries. Alongside local and renowned experts, experience in-depth and behind-the-scenes learning opportunities, from cultural tours and study cruises to walking, biking and more.”

This week the Road Scholars paid a special visit to Hazen’s Riverside Blueberry Farm, where they were treated to an informal talk given by owner Wally Hazen about the history of the farm, including some interesting trivia on the roots of blueberry agriculture in southern Oregon in general, then they shared a picnic lunch and headed out to the berry fields to do some U-picking.

Our family mascot Cooper greeted the group, and all the kids fell in love with him right away. Cooper’s job is to “meet and greet” all of the visitors to the blueberry farm, and to be sure to show off his favorite tennis ball as well. He’s an important member of farm team, and arguably our most popular attraction, other than the great farm fresh berries. The group planned to take their fresh picked blueberries out to the kitchens of the well known Oregon Coast Culinary Institute in Coos Bay to make pies and jam, the perfect ending to a perfect day. We were pleased to have the Road Scholars as our guests today and look forward to many more fun visits from their “traveling learning consortium” in the future!

IMG_2695 IMG_2686 IMG_2691 IMG_2694 IMG_2702 IMG_2697 IMG_2696 IMG_2693 IMG_2707 IMG_2706 IMG_2705 IMG_2685 IMG_2692-crop

Blueberry Pie Recipe from “My Mother’s Footsteps” Blog

I found this really cool blueberry pie recipe posted on My Mother’s Footsteps blog and decided to re-post it for all of us blueberry lovers everywhere. I think the author of the blog is perhaps from the UK. She expressed how fascinated she has always been with the idea of blueberry pie, and stated they didn’t have things like that where she is from.  But I couldn’t find out exactly where she is blogging from.  I’m guessing the UK from photos I saw on her blog. At any rate, she posted a very thorough pie recipe. Enjoy!

Leigh, webmistress, for Hazen’s Riverside Blueberries

Blue Berry Pie

blue berry pieI’ve heard that America is just how we imagine it. With large McDonalds, Wendy’s and krisy cream doughnuts. I heard that diners actually exist, and so does blueberry pie. I have always been fascinated by blue berry pie. We just don’t have anything that is really similar. Blueberry pie, chocolate pie… I know about savory pie, with flaky pastry.

Normally when I make something, or bake something, I never really eat much of it.  But I ate three slices of this for pudding. Then ate some more the next day. And some more. It was tart, sweet, sour, amazing. The pastry was like a fuit mince pie type pastry. I can’t explain that shortcrust taste.

I am not going to try and duplicate the method here. Both the pie and crust I got from Simply Recipe. Going to copy and paste here:

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus extra for rolling
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar (increase to 1 1/2 teaspoons if for a sweet recipe)
  • 8 Tbsp (1 stick) unsalted butter, very-cold, cut into 1/2 inch cubes
  • 3 to 4 Tbsp ice water, very cold

Method

1 The minute you even think you might want to make a pie crust, cut up a stick of butter into smallish (about 1/2-inch) cubes, and put it into the freezer. The colder the butter the better luck you’ll have with creating a flaky crust. Freeze the butter at least 15 minutes, better an hour, best overnight. (I usually keep cubed butter in the freezer ready to go for making pie crusts.)

2 Place the flour, salt, and sugar into a food processor and pulse until well combined. Add half of the butter cubes and pulse 6 to 8 times. Then add the other half of the butter cubes and pulse 6 to 8 more times. You should have a mixture that resembles a coarse meal, with many butter pieces the size of peas.

3 Add a couple of tablespoons of ice cold water (without the ice!) to the food processor bowl and pulse a couple of times. Then add more ice water, slowly, about a tablespoon at a time, pulsing after each addition, until the mixture just barely begins to clump together. If you pinch some of the crumbly dough and it holds together, it’s ready, if not, add a little more water and pulse again. Try to keep the water to a minimum. Too much water will make your crust tough.

4 Remove the crumbly mixture from the food processor and place on a very clean, smooth surface. If you want an extra flaky crust, you can press the heel of your palm into the crumbly mixture, pressing down and shmooshing the mixture into the table top. This is a French technique, called “fraisage”. Do this a few times, maybe 4 to 6 times, and it will help your crust be extra flaky. Then, use your hands to press the crumbly dough together and shape into a disc. Work the dough only enough to just bring the dough together. Do not over-knead or your crust will end up tough. You should be able to see little bits of butter, speckling the dough. When these bits of butter melt as the crust cooks, the butter will help separate the dough into flaky layers. So, visible pieces of butter are a good thing, what you are aiming for, in the dough. Sprinkle the disc with a little flour on all sides. Wrap the disc in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 1 hour. (At this point you can freeze the dough disk for several months until ready to use. Defrost overnight in the refrigerator before proceeding.)

blue berry pie5 When you are ready to roll out the dough, remove the disk from the refrigerator and place on a clean, smooth, lightly floured surface. Let it sit for 5 to 10 minutes to take just enough of a chill off of it so that it becomes easier to roll out. Sprinkle some flour on top of the disk. Using a rolling pin, roll out the dough to a 12 inch circle, to a thickness of about 1/8 of an inch thick. As you roll out the dough, check if the dough is sticking to the surface below. Add a few sprinkles of flour if necessary to keep the dough from sticking. Place on to a 9-inch pie plate, lining up the fold with the center of the pan. Gently unfold and press down to line the pie dish with the dough.

Yield: Makes 1 pâte brisée crust, enough for one tart.

Filling ingredients:

  • 6 cups (about 2 1/4 pounds or 1 kilo) of fresh (or frozen) blueberries, rinsed and stems removed (if using frozen, defrost and drain first)
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup (about 30g) all-purpose flour (for thickening)
  • 1/2 cup white granulated sugar (100g)
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 Tbsp butter (unsalted), cut into small pieces

Egg wash ingredients:

  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon milk

Method

blue berry pie1 Prepare the crust. Roll out half of the dough to 1/8-inch-thick circle on a lightly floured work surface, about 13 inches in diameter. Fit the dough over a 9-inch pie pan, and trim the edges to a 1/2 inch over the edge all around the pan. Put into the refrigerator to chill for about 30 minutes.

2 Gently mix the blueberries, sugar, flour, cinnamon, lemon zest, and lemon juice in a large bowl. Transfer them to the chilled bottom crust of the pie pan. Dot with butter pieces. Roll out remaining dough to the same size and thickness as the first. Place on top of the berry filling. Tuck the top dough over and under the edge of the bottom dough, and crimp the edges with your fingers. Transfer the pie to the refrigerator to chill until the dough is firm, about 30 minutes. Heat oven to 425°F.

3 Whisk egg and milk together to make an egg wash.

4 Remove the unbaked pie from refrigerator. Brush the top with egg wash. Score the pie on the top with 4 cuts (so steam can escape while cooking). Place the pie on the middle rack of the oven with a parchment paper or Silpat lined baking pan positioned on the lower rack to catch any filling that may bubble over. Bake for 20 minutes at 425°. Reduce heat to 350°F and bake for 30 to 40 minutes more or until juices are bubbling and have thickened. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. Let cool completely before serving.

Yield: Makes one pie with 8 servings.